Four parts of evangelism

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Jon Randles is stressing four aspects of effective evangelism today — intentionality, relationships, events and prayer. None of the four will stand well alone, but when you incorporate all four elements you have created the best environment and opportunity for a working of the Holy Spirit in drawing people to faith in Christ.

I think it’s a solid approach. History and personal experience generally have shown that when believers are not intentional in sharing their faith, it seldom gets shared. Recent experience has shown the importance of building relationships, that events alone are not the holy grail of evangelism. Events have become more out of favor in recent years as people highlighted the importance of relationships, but our evangelistic results have suffered during that time. And the importance of prayer should be obvious to all of us.

It’s interesting that the “event” aspect of evangelism is the one that has been challenged most in recent years. Jon Randles, however, has had a different experience. The Lord has been blessing Jon’s four-pronged approach to evangelism on college campuses now for some time, and events are very much a part of it.

I find it interesting that evangelistic events have been out of favor, while worship events have not, at least among pastors. In other words, we all know that worship is about more than just holding a Sunday service; but we continue to hold those weekly worship events because they provide a great opportunity for the possibility of corporate worship occurring.

And there is New Testament precedent for evangelistic events. That’s what Jesus was doing when he spoke to the crowds of His day. Jesus’ ministry was much, much more than speaking to large crowds, but that was one aspect of it.

I think Jon’s approach is worth a try. Events have a place in our evangelistic efforts, but let’s not expect them to stand alone without the relationships, prayer and intentionality that should accompany them. Of course, the types of events that may work today may not be the kind of events that worked a few decades ago. Let’s experiment and dialogue as we seek effective ways to tell the story.

3 Responses to “Four parts of evangelism”

  1. spiritualsamurai Says:

    To reach lost people anything is worth a try except fraud.

  2. David Says:

    About 80 folks–BGCT staff, ministers serving in various positions, and evangelists–from across Texas met last summer in Dallas to discuss evangelism matters in the state. Basically, the conclusions were the same: what appears to aid in greater numbers of people trusting in Christ as Savior is believers being prayerful and intentional and relational toward the lost–and using a variety of events to draw a crowd of unbelievers who will hear the gospel presented. A number of BGCT folks surveyed prior to the summertime meeting already had indicated the same. It seems there is concensus even if there is too little practice–at least, practice evidently not in keeping with the potential across Texas.

    Isn’t the local church basically only responsible for: (1) what gets lost people saved; and, (2) what gets saved people on-mission with God? If so, why do we do so many other things before we do those 2 things extremely well?

  3. Tim Dahl Says:

    “I find it interesting that evangelistic events have been out of favor, while worship events have not, at least among pastors. In other words, we all know that worship is about more than just holding a Sunday service; but we continue to hold those weekly worship events because they provide a great opportunity for the possibility of corporate worship occurring.”

    This paragraph made me laugh a little bit. It seems that the jist of this is: since we have weekly church services, we should have evangelism rallies.

    It also makes me sad. Not because of the lack of congruence of the statement itself, but part of my worry is the continuing death of churches; i.e. those weekly gatherings. It seems that they are going the way of the dinosaur as well…just like the evangelism “events” (rallies).

    I sincerely hope we figure out what God is leading in. I’m definitely praying for that.

    Tim

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